Raspberry Filling and Raspberry Pi

Blinking heck. I’m on the front page of the Raspberry Pi blog. Thanks Liz, and please send any contributions to the user manual to raspberryfilling@live.com

http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/1116

 

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Will I ever blog here properly again.

Yes I will blog here again, particularly when I talk about Android Dev, Game Project Dev, and programming of video games and robots.  But for the time being; check out my latest #AltDevBlogADay posting.

 

We need to educate for our Video Games and VFX industries

Good introductory video on:

http://www.iochannel.tv/

Not much about computer science; just a focus on art & game design on computers (with a smattering of maths and physics). All good skills for computer games and VFX but games will need pure computer scientists too; particularly for tools development, system engineering, code optimisation, concurrency & multiprocessor architectures, artificial intelligence, and online products (security, databases).

IMO

Computing Education in Britain, 2011

I recently wrote an article about the state of British computing education for the game development community. A lot of the community already know about the issue but, I am guessing, there are more that have not and especially across the rest of the world.

Please read my article on #AltDevBlogADay and leave a comment there.

Raspberry Pi for £15 (less than $25)

Very excited to hear the continued development of the Raspberry Pi computer.  Not much bigger than a USB stick it will have the following specification (provisionally):

  • 700MHz ARM11
  • 128MB of SDRAM
  • OpenGL ES 2.0
  • 1080p30 H.264 high-profile decode
  • Composite and HDMI video output
  • USB 2.0
  • SD/MMC/SDIO memory card slot
  • General-purpose I/O
  • Open software (Ubuntu, Iceweasel, KOffice, Python)
See David Braben (of Frontier Developments) talk about the reasoning behind this little computer. Much of the UK is driven by the consumption of computer software and this little beast will open up that access to even more people, especially our children.  However, more importantly, we need to encourage the future producers of computer software and getting this into the hands of children could help.  With the right development environment it could bring forth an innovative era in computer software (and probably games) much like the sub-£100 ZX81 did back in 1981!

NESTA, Video Games and Computer Science Education

Debbie Timmins wonders why a graduate would choose the games industry.  I can’t fault her logic.  Sounds like I’m in the wrong job although luckily I work for one of the few companies that tries to keep its hours normal, and give time off in leiu.

http://spong.com/feature/10110315/Opinion-Why-Would-a-Graduate-Choose-the-Games-Industry

This is in response to NESTA’s report on how they want British education to generate more computer science graduates that go into video games and the visual effects industry.  The one comment I keep hearing when I mention this is: “why train more when there are no jobs?”  There is something wrong with this whole picture.  I got into this business because it is a really profitable and exciting industry but somehow the rewards have been lost (I guess to the greedy) and not put back into the system (in wages for the talented and funding for education).

http://www.psfk.com/2011/02/better-video-game-education-needed.html

Today’s gaming news

Well I’ve had a good few links today:

EDUCATION:

Paul Curzon‘s name has come up again as someone that is doing excellent work at teaching computer science to schools.  He runs the computer science for fun website which is an attractive starting point for anyone wanting to learn about computers.  There must be more education for computer science in the UK if we are going to continue with our very profitible games and visual effects industry.

MAKING STUFF:

I read about the HackSpace foundation today. If you need to build something and don’t have the facilities maybe this can help.  I will have to keep an eye on this for my Arduino projects.  Only a few more weeks to the MakerFaire 2011 in Newcastle.

PIRACY:

A warning about making your revenue making games open source.  I suppose, just make sure that you make it ABSOLUTELY CLEAR that open source, doesn’t mean free for anyone to make money off.

 

 

 

 

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